Overcome Buyers’ Remorse

Tom Hopkins 12-17

If you plan on making a career out of selling, you will need to understand and learn how to overcome buyers’ remorse. It’s as natural a part of selling as nearly any other objection or concern.

In some cases, it’s helpful to bring up the potential for an after-the-sale concern early in your presentation. Then, as you give your presentation, you can disable that concern. You may think that’s a risky way of selling, but for some people and some products it’s quite effective.

What causes buyers’ remorse?

  1. Fear that the money spent on your product or service is gone (the fear of loss is stronger than the happiness of gaining the benefits of ownership).
  2. Receiving negative feedback from others when telling of the new purchase such as from friends or relatives.
  3. Logically analyzing the decision — when we all know that purchases are ultimately emotional decisions.

It’s your job to make the new product more valuable to the buyer than keeping the money they invest in it. Actually, that’s your primary job in this wonderful world of selling.

When buyers aren’t confident enough in their decision to stand up to the criticism of others, you may have to re-sell them on the product and the fact that they have different needs and desires than others. As much as people say they want to be individuals, we are all deeply influenced by the opinions of others and want to fit in–somewhere.

When logic is the culprit in the development of buyers’ remorse, you will need to work on strengthening their emotional commitment to the benefits of your product or service–what they get from it; how it makes them feel; how it makes their lives better, easier or safer.

Here are some words to help you understand how you might address a potential case of buyers’ remorse:

You: I can tell that you are excited about your decision to  own this new 72″ TV. It seems that you’re both excited and somewhat relieved to have finally made the decision to receive hours of enjoyment from it.

Them: Oh, yeah. I’m especially looking forward to having friends over to watch the playoffs.

You: That’s great! (pause) You know, from time to time I’ve known people just like you who were so positive about the decision they made until they shared it with a friend or relative. The well-meaning friends or relatives, not understanding all the facts and maybe even being a little envious, responded negatively to the decision. I hope that won’t happen to you and that you’ll be prepared for people who might be jealous of you. Obviously, you’ve done your homework about this and are confident in your decision.

This little bit of preparation and reinforcement about the decision can go a long way to keeping the sale closed and any second-guessing to a minimum.

Note – If there really is a valid potential reason for your buyer to change his or her mind, such as a roommate or spouse who might be very unhappy with the new purchase (even though they assured you during qualification that there was no one else to consult about the decision), you want to learn about it before they take delivery of the product. That way you might be able to help the buyer come up with a reasonable alternative and still make a sale.


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